Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 29
  1. #1
    Beginner
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Location
    Pembrokeshire
    Posts
    30

    Protruding chokes - unavoidable?

    I seen a good deal of advice the effect that beginners should consider buying a sport rather than a game gun. That seems to make sense for people like myself who plan to re-start shooting but who will be doing more clays than game, at least initially. I would say the chances of me going on the kind of shoot where those attending look down on a sporter are very low.

    I have looked at and handled a few guns, including a Blaser F16 last week that exuded an impressive sense of quality and precision, although the stock was not very pretty. If my budget would stretch (which it probably will not) I would be quite interested in the sporting version of the F16.

    What I don't like about sporting models is the protruding chokes. Are these unavoidable for sporting guns? Can one get chokes that don't stick out as obviously or is this just part and parcel of buying a sporter?

    Thanks,
    Dan

  2. #2
    Super Moderator BerettaSV10's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Shropshire
    Posts
    2,208
    A fair few guns do now come with extended chokes as standard, as they are supposed to be easier to remove and give the constriction of the choke a smoother taper. You can if you want buy additional flush fit chokes either from the gun manufactures through a dealer or after market chokes on the likes of Teaque, Briely and several other ones around.

    Some guns like the Browning 725 depending on the variant of it come with flush fit on the S1 or extended like on the S3 black.

    Game guns do tend to come with flush fit chokes, but the disadvantage of game guns is they are lighter than sporter models which mean they are primary designed to shoot a few cartridges a day where the sporters are designed to soak up more recoil (can depend on the choice of cartridge you use as well) and shoot all day without suffering from recoil effect, or at least lesson the effect of recoil. Another disadvantage of game guns they normally are auto safety guns, which means you have to remember to switch the safety off every time you shoot it.
    Can't beat having a day out shooting clays.

  3. #3
    Beginner
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Location
    Pembrokeshire
    Posts
    30
    Thanks, that seems logical.
    So what you're really saying is that I need two guns, right? ;-)

    Dan

  4. #4
    Veteran neutron619's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Cambridgeshire
    Posts
    1,997
    It would appear that you can buy Blaser chokes in the "after" market.
    .
    http://www.gun.co.uk/shop/chokes/blaser-flush-choke/
    Freedom is having the right to offend and be offended; politeness is temporarily eschewing that right in respect of others; maturity is understanding the compromise and applying it.

  5. #5
    Top Gun Mike George's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    North Scotland
    Posts
    852
    Protruding chokes may be efficient for lots of reasons, but aren't they ugly! Personally, I prefer something that looks like a gun, rather than a shooting machine. And while I'm airing personal preferences, I still prefer fixed chokes - but then, I am an old fogey!
    Technical Editor, Sporting Gun

  6. #6
    Veteran neutron619's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Cambridgeshire
    Posts
    1,997
    Quote Originally Posted by Mike George View Post
    Protruding chokes may be efficient for lots of reasons, but aren't they ugly! Personally, I prefer something that looks like a gun, rather than a shooting machine. And while I'm airing personal preferences, I still prefer fixed chokes - but then, I am an old fogey!
    I'm not an old fogey Mike (and I don't think you are really - unless you really want to be!) but I agree with you - fixed chokes are much better for having confidence in your kit.
    .
    You'll know by now that I've played (and continue to play about) with all things choke and cartridge in the interests of scientific study, but for the actual hunting, I don't think I've changed a choke or cartridge in any of my guns for about 18 months. Now that I've settled down a bit as far as being in the field goes, I don't expect to. If you could "machine back" choke and put it in rather than just take it out, I'd probably be happy to do that with all but one of the multichoke guns I own!
    .
    As for protruding chokes giving any advantage - well - I don't buy it. Any measurable increase in performance could be easily obliterated by changing to a different cartridge and chasing pattern percentage by itself is only useful if you can actually take advantage of it. My fixed-choke 16 gauge consistently shoots 80%+ at 40 yards out of one barrel with one of my reloads and is practical only for 50-70 yard birds. When I'm on form, I'm doing well if I hit one in four at that range - and mostly I'm not on form!
    .
    Then again, I can't quite face getting it reamed out, when I could - say - pick up a nice, open-choked 20 bore and use that for the short range stuff instead.
    .
    Come to think of it, the manufacturers haven't really thought this multi-choke sh*t through properly. Not having exactly the combination of fixed chokes you want is a brilliant excuse to buy more guns...
    Freedom is having the right to offend and be offended; politeness is temporarily eschewing that right in respect of others; maturity is understanding the compromise and applying it.

  7. #7
    Super Moderator BerettaSV10's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Shropshire
    Posts
    2,208
    Quote Originally Posted by westernshooting View Post
    Thanks, that seems logical.
    So what you're really saying is that I need two guns, right? ;-)

    Dan

    I have used a game gun for clays and still do on occasions when I need to, my current game gun as soon as I got it home took the auto safety off, on this particular it was a simple job where others are best done by a gun smith.

    A friend uses a Beretta ultra light for clays though does use low recoil cartridges like the Hull comp X range.
    Can't beat having a day out shooting clays.

  8. #8
    Beginner
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Location
    Pembrokeshire
    Posts
    30
    Thanks to everybody for their advice.
    .
    BerettaSV10 and neutron619 - I didn't realise that flush chokes were an option, so that is good to know. So the real issue is weight/recoil.
    .
    Mike - agreed, those extended chokes are ugly to my eyes. I do like a traditional-looking gun, and would actually like a kind of "modernised" side-by-side. What stops me is budget (the eternal constraint) and the idea that side-by-sides are harder to shoot. Otherwise I'd have a Beretta 486 Parallelo in a flash.
    .
    Regards
    Dan

  9. #9
    Veteran ROBERT6500's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    SOMERSET / WILTSHIRE / DORSET.
    Posts
    6,035
    Just about any sporter can come with flush multi chokes or at least are available in after market chokes so its not really a problem.
    From 53 years of shooting experience and practically having a crack at everything legally shootable in that time I can honestly say that just one gun is definitely best. As the saying goes......'Beware the man with one gun'.....that is because the man with one gun will know exactly where to put the muzzles to kill anything as he will be use to the gun. This is of course depending on gun fit and masses of shooting experience.
    The man with 2-5-9-16 shot guns however is very rarely a good shot as all the guns are different and all fit different so therefore put the shot pattern in different places and not where they think its going.
    I myself use a fitted 30 year old S686S Beretta 30" fixed choke gun for just about everything as I know the gun so well and its very well made. I also have a stunning old Winchester 6500 mk2 which I have had fitted but the gun is rare these days in that condition with exhibition grade wood, so it rarely goes out accept on special occasions.
    But I have to be honest and say that since not using the winchester so much I definitely don't shoot so well with it as I did 10 years ago, even though its a flush fit multi-choke gun. I've even tried extended Teague chokes in it and it wasn't any better. All this is is because i'm not so familiar with that gun gun these days. Now the Beretta on the other hand is a different thing completely because I use it all the time. If I use any of my coaching guns I have the same problem as with the winchester. The scores ares are ok but could be better because I rarely shoot them.
    Buy a decent sporter and get it fitted in about a couple of months and stick with it, leave the game gun alone as its a different beast. The game gun will basically shoot the same if fitted as the sporter but its lighter and will move very fast if you are use to a sporter. Being light it will also recoil which nobody wants or indeed needs. It never ceases to amaze me why game shooters buy a light gun and then put 32-54 gram cartridges through them, it's crazy. I accept there are a few exceptions where shooters are old and weak so find lifting an 8-9lb gun difficult. Also they may have to carry it up hill and down dale. But if you are in good health then stick with just one good sporter and use big cartridges if you have to in comfort on a game shoot.
    Go out and learn to shoot your fitted 30"sporter on clays and then enjoy your sporter on games as well. If you have flush chokes nobody will even know it's a sporter unless you have a high rib on it but stay away from those, for a few years at least
    The Original Shootinguk Moderator.
    Resident Coach on Shootinguk.
    Association of Professional Shooting Instructors. (A.P.S.I.)
    C.P.S.A Safety Officer.
    B.A.S.C

  10. #10
    Beginner
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Location
    Pembrokeshire
    Posts
    30
    Quote Originally Posted by ROBERT6500 View Post
    Go out and learn to shoot your fitted 30"sporter on clays and then enjoy your sporter on games as well. If you have flush chokes nobody will even know it's a sporter unless you have a high rib on it but stay away from those, for a few years at least
    Thank you for the helpful comments. Choice of gun is clearly central to the sport and dear to the heart of the shooter. Personally I like to get the best kit I can afford so that if something goes wrong I know that it's me, rather than the equipment, that is the issue. And, more prosaically, high-quality items hold their value better if you need to sell them on.
    .
    On the other hand, although I would like an F16 or a Parallelo, throwing 3,000 at a gun when starting out seems unwise. I may just be able to afford one, I don't think I can justify one.
    .
    Which brings us nicely to the ATA that you mentioned in a different thread.
    .
    Is this gun close to what you were using? When you look at what you get for 850, it's a tempting proposition.
    .
    Dan

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •