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  1. #1
    Veteran neutron619's Avatar
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    Recoil: Missing In Action

    After a good trip out yesterday, I just thought I'd make an amateur observation on the subject of recoil (and note a small achievement of which I'm proud).
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    I think that, between us, we do spend a lot of time trying to minimize the effects of recoil - and indeed, recoil itself. However, I was surprised yesterday to discover just how important recoil is to one's shooting routine.
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    I bagged 9 wood pigeons over newly drilled barley stubble yesterday afternoon using my .410. It didn't start well - I was trying out a stock extension pad on the gun and had fired 10 shots before I connected with my first bird. I allowed myself to miss another 10 missed attempts before I took the pad off and shot without it. After that, I hit the next four in a row, including my first left-and-right with that gun, so the pad went back in the bag and didn't see the light of day again!
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    In wasting so many shells for the first bird, I used up my supply of "hunting" cartridges, by which I mean the ones I've patterned and found to work well enough in that gun to actually point them at live game. In fact, I hadn't intended to shoot any birds at all but was out to pattern test three new brands of cartridges. High wind and passing cumulonimbi depositing their contents soon put paid to that idea, but seeing plenty of birds milling around was enough to divert me and I set up a pattern for a bit, hiding in the hedgerow from the thunderstorms.
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    I was left with only the three assorted boxes of cartridges I'd originally intended to pattern test. I tried all of them, and (briefly) the Hull High Pheasant 19g/#6 load showed promise (the left-and-right), the Lyalvale Supreme Game 14g/#6 was adequate for short range shooting but seemed to lack the pattern density for low, incoming birds and the Fiocchi GFL36 11g/#6 were (as expected) a pile of poo.
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    The Lyalvale cartridges were the most interesting of the three: they produced no discernible recoil, which surprised me so much the first time I fired one that I stopped the gun dead, missed the second shot and found myself checking the barrels to see if the wad had got stuck halfway down them. All was well, thankfully, but I found I just couldn't get on with them - the lack of recoil was completely off-putting.
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    Granted, lack of recoil isn't going to be an issue with the average 12 gauge, but it does show the importance of every part of taking the shot - even the bits we might like to avoid. I thought that was interesting.
    Freedom is having the right to offend and be offended; politeness is temporarily eschewing that right in respect of others; maturity is understanding the compromise and applying it.

  2. #2
    Young Shot
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    Although it has been far too long since I've hunted, two things that I do recall having noticed. I've never felt the recoil nor heard the report of the gun I was using. Same thing for action shooting, I do use ear protection, I never feel the kick of the gun. Oh in practice I do, but not "In the heat of the moment".

  3. #3
    Veteran neutron619's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GLS_1956 View Post
    Although it has been far too long since I've hunted, two things that I do recall having noticed. I've never felt the recoil nor heard the report of the gun I was using. Same thing for action shooting, I do use ear protection, I never feel the kick of the gun. Oh in practice I do, but not "In the heat of the moment".
    I definitely understand what you're saying - I always feel it a lot less when there's a bird streaking past than when I fire shells at my pattern plate to test them. Sometimes makes me wonder how on earth anyone puts up with it! Nonetheless, the Lyalvale shell was particularly soft, to the point I was concerned about a misfire and it was rather offputting!
    Freedom is having the right to offend and be offended; politeness is temporarily eschewing that right in respect of others; maturity is understanding the compromise and applying it.

  4. #4
    Veteran ROBERT6500's Avatar
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    Remember, putting a stock extension on the gun mate will make the comb/stock lower and often too low, altering your sight picture and that of the target/bird to one that you are not use too. It can often make you cross eye dominant as well. A short stock is not ideal but is far better than one that's too long as you can mount fast without snagging. You can also get use to a gun that is a bit short and high very quickly but a gun with a stock that's either too long or too low or worse is both is a recipe for disaster.
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