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  1. #1
    Veteran
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    Apr 2010
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    First Buck of the season

    Lit up a lot of Roe the other night while lamping bunnies so mate and me decided to try and thin them out.
    Spotted two as I drove onto his lane but they trned out to be Does.My dog doesn't know the difference(nor care probably) so I had to stop her giving chase.It's a terrier thing,and as such she is imbued with a never ending supply of optimism,and has in the past chased all manner of things,including flying duck!
    Mate was waiting with his Sako 75 in .243Win,and I had with me my Tikka T3,also in .243Win,and apart from a zeroing session this would be its first outing.Both are of the heavy barrelled 'varmint' type,his being stainless/laminated;mine being blued/synthetic.
    Apart from a few pheasants my dog put up,the gorse banking drew a blank,though we scattered a couple more Does as we enterd the wood.
    This wasn;t going to be easy,the recent storms had damaged a lot of trees,and the floor was a carpeted network of dry/brittle twigs and branches.As we clambered through the undergrowth with all the grace and elegance of a couple of Bison;my dog sending cackling cocks into the treetops at every opportunity, we simply looked at each other and burst out laughing!
    All attempts at stealth now gone,we carried on regardless and just spotted a Buck as it tried to slip past on the rivers edge below.He was in no particular hurry,and when he stopped to graze we even got our scopes on him,but neither of us hada clear shot.He disappeared over the brow and we dropped to the valley floor,reckoning he'd made for the gorse.
    As we entered the expanse of the valley,out of the woods,and walked along the river banking,we spotted him in a clearing in the gorse,no more than 150 yards away.He watched us as we moved further along to offer us a better shot,then we both swung out the legs of our rifles and got down in the grass with my heart pounding...this is when the adrenalin really kicks in,and although I didn't look at her,I knew from experience my dog would be shaking like a leaf!
    We both loaded a round and I told mate to fire when ready,and I was ready with a back-up shot if needed.After what seemed ages he fired and the Buck dropped and all seemed still,but as we got to our feet the Buck tried to get to his,so we both quickly dropped back down,I drew a bead just above the joint and down he went again,gave a short kick,and that was it.
    It's at this point that I always feel a tinge of regret at killing such a magnificent animal,but nothing will be wasted,and he's now hanging in one of the outbuildings.We'll probably butch him one evening this week.Will post pic's when mate has figured out how to send me pictures on his new iPhone!

  2. #2
    Young Shot
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Scotland
    Posts
    454
    Sounds like a good day. Looking forward to seeing the pics.
    I only have a small family of roe come through my ground so don't want to touch them. They have enough trouble from poachers. I've been looking for permission from someone with a roe management problem and hopefully going to get out stalking for the first time next month. Really looking forward to it. Been looking at all sorts of tasty venison recipes in anticipation.
    Tom
    Scotland

  3. #3
    Administrator BarnyUK's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    London
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    737
    Awesome stuff eddie - i'm off stalking in Dumfriesshire on the 26th.







    That really got me in the mood!







    B

  4. #4
    Veteran
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    Apr 2010
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    Westmorland, Cumbria
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    You'll love it Barny.I sometimes get up to Carrick,near Gatehouse of Fleet,which is fabulous shooting terrain if tourism allows.Let us know how you get on.
    Do you use .223 for Roe as you're in Scotland Tom,or prefer something heavier?I've no doubt the calibre is up to the job,but have no experience of it as a hunting round.

  5. #5
    Young Shot
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Scotland
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    454
    I've never actually stalkd yet. I bought my .223 for fox controil but with the added advantage if I needed to control roa numbers on my young orchard., I could. Because theres only a famly of 5 or 6 deer pass through and they do minimal damage I prefer to keep them so havn't had to sue it on pest deer.

    I've spoken to a lot of folk who shoot roe localy. I woudl say out of the dozen or so folk I know who shoot them its about 50/50 split between .223 and .243. I'll be using my .223 when I go out.
    Tom
    Scotland

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