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Thread: parasite eggs.

  1. #1
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    parasite eggs.

    Hello all, I have never been on any forum before so please excuse me if I do something wrong.
    Ive been shooting air rifles for a number of years and eat almost everything I shoot,Rats get disposed of. I recently went shooting and bagged myself some bunnies, One of the rabbits had a cavity inside its back leg which was full of what looked like eggs. The eggs were about one millimeter and were pure white. There were an awful lot of these eggs which were in a clear fluid inside the cavity. As you can imagine it put me off eating rabbits. Any ideas what these might be as I am stumped and an internet search has proved fruitless. Once I have figured out how to post pictures I will upload a photo of the rabbit leg plus eggs.
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  2. #2
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    I was going to say tapeworm eggs,as these are sometimes found as you describe,in a sac of clear liquid;but I've never found any inside a muscle as you describe,only under the skin but outside the tissue,if that makes sense,where they are easily spotted and therefore avoided.Interesting.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by eddie View Post
    I was going to say tapeworm eggs,as these are sometimes found as you describe,in a sac of clear liquid;but I've never found any inside a muscle as you describe,only under the skin but outside the tissue,if that makes sense,where they are easily spotted and therefore avoided.Interesting.
    Like a fool, I looked into this further on t'internet and now I will never eat meat again ;-)

    Apparently they are likely to be encysted tapeworm eggs, which hang around in the flesh until some unsuspecting predator devours the host and, naturally, them with it. They can find their way into subcutaneous tissue, muscle, mucous membranes or THE EYES!

    Damn, Nature: you scary!

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    Thanks Asher......anyone want to buy some nice (ish) guns?Now,sure I've seen some cous cous in the back of the fridge somewhere.

  5. #5
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    We all know that eating stuff we shoot has certain risks and it's up to us to ensure we properly inspect our meat before cooking.

    Before you even start butchering you bunny or whatever you've shot, have a look at it and ask yourself 'Now does this critter look at all ill? If he does, them don't eat him.
    'Trust your senses when butchering, you know what decent fresh meat should look and smell like, if it doesn't look right don't eat it. As you have done here, have a good look for anything that looks suspect and if you find something, don't eat it!
    The kidneys are quite a good indicator of general health too, familiarise yourself with what healthy kidneys for a given species should look like and make a habit of inspecting them in every animal you eat.

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    Thanks for the info. I always check the liver and kidneys for anything that doesnt look right,the worst i have seen is white flecking on the liver. When i see anything that looks dodgy I leave the rabbits for the foxs. I must say that the organs all looked good,I was cooking the liver kidneys lungs and hearts for my dog when I found the eggs. Everything went in the bin after that.

  7. #7
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    Thanks Asher, All i found on iternet was worms that live in the intestinal tract. Surly most of the rabbits are infected with worms? was thinking of shooting then disposing of the rabbits in a big hole. do you think this might help reduce the spread of tape worms. The fox's will have to be cut down a bit too I presume.

  8. #8
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    My point was, don't let it put you off eating what you shoot. As long as you properly inspect the carcass before cooking then you'll be fine. If anything looks slightly dodgy then bin it.
    I wouldn't have given any of it to the dogs though, dogs get worms too and one of the most common causes of humans catching them is not from eating bad meat but from contact with infected dogs and horses.

  9. #9
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    I didnt give any to the dogs on the night i found the eggs, I only keep the saddle meat then boil the rest for the dogs. They were very upset to see 3 rabbits being put in the bin though. Will have to get out this weekend and make it up to them.Dogs would be fine they get wormed regular, its me that has never been wormed.

  10. #10
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    Hi, I do a lot of ferreting and have never seen this, have seen damage to legs where the skin has healed. Shouldn't be maggots this time of year and looking at the picture completely different. I cook rabbits for the dogs, the ferrets usually have a whole rabbit raw. If I did see this then I would of removed the eggs and carried on cooking the rabbit. Rabbits do carry worms any way, so by cooking the meat you are killing the worms. Ferrets can get worms too, in the years I have kept ferrets I have never had a problem (touch wood). I feed my ferrets with the fur intact as this helps clean the digestive tract and helps rid worms. I definitely would cook rabbits for dogs with out a doubt. The only rabbits I wouldn't feed are those with mixi and those with suspect organs as previously mentioned.

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